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Friday
Jan252013

How to Get Rid of a Charley Horse

Ever wake up in the middle of the night because your calf muscles started seizing on you? It's a really painful and stretching or flexing the leg only intensifies the pain.

Here's my tip for getting rid of a Charley Horse that works for me immediately, every time. Stand up. Yup, that's it. As soon as you wake up from a Charley Horse, DO NOT flex or stretch your leg, but instead, just get out of bed and plant your two feet on the floor. IMMEDIATELY the pain will subside. The calf will still feel tight, but you'll feel instant relief.

 

Reader Comments (4)

Thank you! I will try that. They are the worst!

01.25.2013 | Unregistered CommenterWinnie

Hi Winnie, I used to be so afraid of getting them at night since they were so painful, but now, with this tip, I have no fear!

I love this tip! I have a horrible habit of waking up confused thinking my leg is broken, because they are so painful and surprising :) It's always funny after it happened, but definitely not during!

01.26.2013 | Unregistered CommenterRebecca

Hi Rebecca, nope, definitely not funny during. Hope this tip helps you with your "broken" leg"

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