How to Make Fresh Ginger Tea Properly

4.57 from 185 votes

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Hot ginger tea is great for warming up on a cold day or for when you’re feeling under the weather. See how to make this herbal tea properly using fresh ginger, with tips from a Tea Sommelier.

Hot ginger tea in a cup.

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Fresh Ginger Tea

Ginger tea is a drink made by steeping fresh or dried ginger in water. It’s an herbal beverage and doesn’t contain any caffeine. Ginger used in tea is the root of a flowering plant and it can be eaten raw or cooked. It’s spicy so a little goes a long way.

Ginger tea made from scratch, using fresh ginger, may seem like a lot of work, but it’s actually quick and easy using a couple of shortcuts that involves a grater.

RELATED: Starbucks Medicine Ball Tea Copycat Recipe

5 Ginger Tea Health Benefits

1. Contains Antioxidants

Ginger is an excellent source of health-promoting antioxidant compounds. This mainly includes gingerols, parasols, and shogaols. Antioxidants protect your cells by minimizing free radicals and oxidative stress, a major cause of chronic disease.

2. Reduces Inflammation

The antioxidants in ginger also have anti-inflammatory effects on the body. They work by reducing certain proteins, called pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are involved in inflammation. This may help manage inflammatory diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

3. Minimizes Nausea

Ginger may ease nausea caused by surgery, medication, motion sickness, or pregnancy. Ginger also helps control other digestive issues like gas, bloating, stomach cramping, which often appear with nausea.

4. Manages High Blood Pressure 

One of the biggest risk factors for heart disease is high blood pressure, or hypertension. Ginger can reduce the risk by increasing substances that widen blood vessels, ultimately improving blood flow and reducing pressure.

5. Protects Brain Function

The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of gingerols and shogaols can protect your neurons, or nerve cells. This may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, as well as other memory disorders.

Side Effects of Ginger Tea

Ginger and ginger tea might cause heartburn, diarrhea, and stomach discomfort, especially if you drink too much. The strong, spicy flavor may also irritate your mouth. If this happens when you drink ginger tea, consider diluting the drink with more water.

Ginger might increase the risk of bleeding, according to Mount Sinai Hospital. More research is needed, but if you’re taking blood-thinning medications, ask your doctor if it’s safe to drink ginger tea.

RELATED: Ginger Syrup

Ingredient Notes

Ginger tea ingredients.
  • Fresh ginger: Find ginger root in the produce section of your supermarket. Look for firm pieces that look plump.
  • Lemon: Sliced lemons or lemon juice both work.
  • Honey: Use any kind of honey you have available.
  • Water: Tea is mostly made of water so use filtered water if possible.

For full ingredients and detailed instructions, please see the recipe card at the bottom of the post.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Grated ginger in a glass teapot.

Step 1: Peel and grate ginger. Grate ginger straight into the teapot.

Hot water poured into a glass teapot with lemon slices and grated ginger.

Step 2: Add lemon slices and hot water into the teapot.

Teapot with lemon slices, grated ginger, and hot water.

Step 3: Cover and steep.

Herbals teas can steep for longer than black tea or green tea. The longer you steep, the stronger the ginger and lemon flavor.

Pouring ginger tea into a glass mug.

Step 4: Strain solids and pour hot tea into a teacup. Add honey to taste.

Recipe Notes

No need to buy the entire ginger root.

Avoid buying fresh ginger root that’s shriveled and dry. Look for one that’s plump and firm. Ginger is usually sold by weight, not by the piece, so don’t be afraid to break off a piece of the freshest ginger root in the pile if it’s too big.

Adjust ginger as needed.

Add as much or little ginger as you like since it can get too spicy. For a serving of 1 cup of water, I’m using an half inch of fresh ginger root. If you want a milder taste, use less ginger.

Keep grated ginger in the freezer.

You can grate ginger ahead of time and freeze it. Store it in a resealable plastic bag, flattening it before freezing.

RELATED: How to Freeze and Store Fresh Ginger

Expert Tips

  • A teapot with a strainer lid or a French press is great for making ginger tea.
  • Instead of sliced lemons, you can also use the juice from half a lemon.
  • To peel fresh ginger easily, use a spoon to scrape off the peel.
  • Make sure to scrub and wash the lemons before slicing them.
  • For a refreshing summer drink, make it iced by cooling the drink down, then adding ice.

Questions You May Have

Is there caffeine in this drink?

There’s no caffeine in ginger tea.

Can I eat the ginger pulp instead of straining it out?

Yes! I strain out the ginger but you can definitely leave it in if you prefer.

Does honey lose its nutrients once its added to hot water?

There are claims that you destroy the good enzymes in honey if you add it to boiling hot water. If you’re worried about this, add the honey to your teacup after the tea has cooled down a little.

Ginger tea in a teapot with lemon slices.

Related

If you tried this Fresh Ginger Tea recipe, please leave a ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ star rating and let me know how you like it in the comments below.

4.57 from 185 votes

Fresh Ginger Tea

By: Jee Choe
A warming hot tea made with fresh ginger, lemon, and honey.
Prep Time: 3 minutes
Total Time: 8 minutes
Servings: 1 serving (16 ounces)

Ingredients 

  • 2 cups water
  • ½ lemon, thinly sliced
  • 1 inch fresh ginger root
  • 1 tablespoon honey

Instructions 

  • Peel and grate ginger.
    Peel one inch piece of fresh ginger root and grate into a teapot.
  • Add lemon slices and hot water into the teapot. Cover and steep for 5 minutes.
    Use filtered water for the best quality ginger tea. Boiling hot water should be used. If using an electric kettle with a temperature setting, set it to 208°F.
  • Strain solids and pour hot tea into a teacup. Add honey to taste.

Notes

  • Avoid buying fresh ginger root that’s shriveled and dry. Look for one that’s plump and firm. Ginger is usually sold by weight don’t be afraid to break off a piece of the freshest ginger root in the pile if it’s too big.
  • To peel fresh ginger easily, use a spoon to scrape off the peel.
  • Add as much or little ginger as you like since it can get too spicy. For a serving of 1 cup of water, a half inch of ginger root in this recipe. If you want a milder taste, use less ginger.
  • You can grate ginger ahead of time and freeze it. Store it in a resealable plastic bag, flattening it before freezing. When you need some grated ginger, snap off a piece.
  • Instead of sliced lemons, you can also use the juice from half a lemon.
  • Make sure to scrub and wash the lemons before slicing them.
  • Herbals teas can steep for longer than black tea or green tea. The longer you steep, the stronger the ginger and lemon flavor.

Nutrition

Calories: 43Carbohydrates: 12gProtein: 1gFat: 1gSaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 13mgPotassium: 37mgFiber: 1gSugar: 9gVitamin C: 14mgCalcium: 14mgIron: 1mg

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Drinks
Cuisine: American
Tried this recipe?Mention @ohhowcivilized or tag #ohhowcivilized!

About Jee Choe

Welcome! I'm a certified Tea Sommelier and a self-proclaimed bubble tea and iced tea master. I'm all about making tea EASY and DELICIOUS.

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46 Comments

    1. Hi Linda, the cup is from CB2 and the glass teapot and strainer is from Amazon — you’ll see it linked in the post!

  1. Grating ginger for a fast brew – brilliant! Thanks!
    FYI, I took it another step to be even faster…

    Grating takes what ever time it takes. But rather that grate the ginger each time, I now grate a bunch – usually the whole root, and freeze. I put a healthy tablespoon in each cube of an ice cube tray, fill each gently with water, and freeze.

    Once they are frozen, I take them out of the tray and store in a freezer-proof canning jar in the freezer. Yes, all this takes a little time, but after that…

    When I want a cup of tea, I just take out a cube, put it in a tea ball in my cup, pour in boiling water, and let it steep just as you would any other kind of tea. (I have a big tea ball – I’m not sure if the ice/ginger cube would fit in a small tea ball.) Two ice/ginger cubes in a french press work just as well if I’m making a couple cups.

    It’s a little more work up front for many super fast cups of ginger tea later.

  2. I’ve read in many places that it’s unhealthy to add boiling water to honey, but in your recipe you suggest to do this. Would it be better to add the honey to the filtered tea once it’s cooled down a bit?

    1. Hi Curtis, I haven’t heard of this, but yes, add the honey after the steep if you want to avoid adding honey to boiling water.

      1. Would placing small slices in juicer be more effective than grating? I could just pour juice in boiling hot water and add lemon and honey? Agree or not?

    1. It won’t be as potent as freshly grated ginger but if it’s all you have on hand, go for it!